Worst. Modules. Ever.

atavist5

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While I imagine some of the threads like these are trying to find the 'worst things ever' to grant them a sort of horrible immortality like FATAL, has anyone gone through these and the 'best module' threads and gathered up a more useful list of do's and don'ts for all the posters that dream of one day making an excellent module?
 

s/LaSH

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While I imagine some of the threads like these are trying to find the 'worst things ever' to grant them a sort of horrible immortality like FATAL, has anyone gone through these and the 'best module' threads and gathered up a more useful list of do's and don'ts for all the posters that dream of one day making an excellent module?
I don't think I've played any of the modules in this thread; my contributions have been mostly "what if you tweaked this, would it be better?".

I believe that criticism is only valid if it's constructive.

(Of course, sometimes the optimal way to construct is to plant seeds in the ashes that are all that remains after you burned it to the ground. But in all honesty, hyperbolic solutions are rarely productive.)
 

Kardwill

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And this kind of thing is why I made the decisions I did. Besides, I've known too many players of telepaths who just go nuts with this kind of thing, screw ethics....

...And the underlying need is to stop Psychics from being The Most Important Thing. I mean, Psychic powers are useful. They can be a great tool! But other tools can be great, too, and you can do amazing things without them. (PCs are assumed to be kinda... Pulp Hero levels of skillful.)
Reminds me of the way Dresden Files handle mind magic.

Since the novels are about a wizard private eye, simply having him read minds would completely blow up the investigation/mystery part of the books. So, in the Dresdenverse, mind magic (reading thoughts, influencing or controlling people's emotions, implanting false memories...) is the blackest of magic, deeply corrupting for the mage, one of the 7 offenses carrying an immediate death sentence in Wizard Council law. The justification is that entering the mind of someone is like breaking in his house, ransacking it in search of information, then redecorating it by breaking walls and throwing buckets of paint over the furnitures, except you're doing that to his brain. It's the ultimate violation. Nobody can experience this and not go insane. One of the novels has a young wizard who tries to implant a distaste of drugs in her friends' minds so they won't fuck up their unborn child, and the consequences are pretty ugly. And so is the temptation/corruption to use mind magic again to "correct my mistakes and do it right, this time"

I like those limitations in the RPG (no killing with magic, no mind invasion, no enslavement of a sentient being, no transforming other people, no playing with the dead, no time travel, no playing with other dimentions and summoning Chtulhu), since it gives "organic" limits and dangers to what is otherwise a very powerful and versatile tool (and allows for some pretty wicked villains, when you think about the way those magics could go very, very wrong).
 

Coyote's Own

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Reminds me of the way Dresden Files handle mind magic.

Since the novels are about a wizard private eye, simply having him read minds would completely blow up the investigation/mystery part of the books. So, in the Dresdenverse, mind magic (reading thoughts, influencing or controlling people's emotions, implanting false memories...) is the blackest of magic, deeply corrupting for the mage, one of the 7 offenses carrying an immediate death sentence in Wizard Council law. The justification is that entering the mind of someone is like breaking in his house, ransacking it in search of information, then redecorating it by breaking walls and throwing buckets of paint over the furnitures, except you're doing that to his brain. It's the ultimate violation. Nobody can experience this and not go insane. One of the novels has a young wizard who tries to implant a distaste of drugs in her friends' minds so they won't fuck up their unborn child, and the consequences are pretty ugly. And so is the temptation/corruption to use mind magic again to "correct my mistakes and do it right, this time"

I like those limitations in the RPG (no killing with magic, no mind invasion, no enslavement of a sentient being, no transforming other people, no playing with the dead, no time travel, no playing with other dimentions and summoning Chtulhu), since it gives "organic" limits and dangers to what is otherwise a very powerful and versatile tool (and allows for some pretty wicked villains, when you think about the way those magics could go very, very wrong).
And in Fate RPG doing that can give you Lawbreaker stunt, which can bring it past they're fate point refresh limit.
Since the Refresh limit is deified as the character free will (supernatural chareacture have lower refresh because their nature limits their free will, being bound by insticts and comuplsions), that means the character has no free will now and become an NPC (which is bit harcher then doing damage to the traget).
 

Numanoid

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The thing with judging adventure modules is I find the bad ones all seem to have at least 1 of 2 things in common, either 1. they contain tasteless/inappropriate/hateful content, or 2. the provide the PC with little to no sense of agency.
 

Kardwill

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The thing with judging adventure modules is I find the bad ones all seem to have at least 1 of 2 things in common, either 1. they contain tasteless/inappropriate/hateful content, or 2. the provide the PC with little to no sense of agency.
"Horribly bland" or "Completely missing the point of the game they're supposed to be a module for" are also points that come up quite often in the thread. But they're less likely to come up as horror stories as yours, true.
 

Arethusa

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Reminds me of the way Dresden Files handle mind magic.

Since the novels are about a wizard private eye, simply having him read minds would completely blow up the investigation/mystery part of the books. So, in the Dresdenverse, mind magic (reading thoughts, influencing or controlling people's emotions, implanting false memories...) is the blackest of magic, deeply corrupting for the mage, one of the 7 offenses carrying an immediate death sentence in Wizard Council law. The justification is that entering the mind of someone is like breaking in his house, ransacking it in search of information, then redecorating it by breaking walls and throwing buckets of paint over the furnitures, except you're doing that to his brain. It's the ultimate violation. Nobody can experience this and not go insane. One of the novels has a young wizard who tries to implant a distaste of drugs in her friends' minds so they won't fuck up their unborn child, and the consequences are pretty ugly. And so is the temptation/corruption to use mind magic again to "correct my mistakes and do it right, this time"

I like those limitations in the RPG (no killing with magic, no mind invasion, no enslavement of a sentient being, no transforming other people, no playing with the dead, no time travel, no playing with other dimentions and summoning Chtulhu), since it gives "organic" limits and dangers to what is otherwise a very powerful and versatile tool (and allows for some pretty wicked villains, when you think about the way those magics could go very, very wrong).
“No playing with the dead?” Puppydog eyes.
 
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