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[WotC] D&D Fortune Cards

Mechalus

Registered User
Validated User
My stance, that of finding it a clunky method to put a $4+ tax on particular D&D community events, remains the same when this was called the "Gamma World Booster" debate.
Correct me if I'm wrong, because I haven't played GW yet and only read the blurb about the Fortune cards in the link, but...

In GW, you don't know what cards you get, and you get a random card for each encounter right? It sounds like the player constructs a deck with the Fortune cards and plays them as they are triggered by events in the game.

So if I understand how these cards are used, the GW cards don't have a significant impact on play balance while the Fortune cards could give you major power boost with an optimized deck.
 

RadioKen

well versed in chalupa law
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Yeah, the only way I could see using them is in a big-ol communal deck. I wouldn't let one dude show up with his "tuned" fortune deck and anotherr with his "bare" character.

Honestly, though, I don't see what they would add to my home games, so yeah. I can sympathize with WotC trying to find more ways to monotize D&D into different products for us to buy, but... this doesn't do it for me.

For my money, stick with the meat-and-potatoes. Give me more quality adventures, and throw in some counters Monster-Vault/DMK style, and you'll get some more of my gaming dollahs.
I think little counter packs would have been a much better way to reach down into that ~$5 price point they seem to be shooting for with these cards.
 

RadioKen

well versed in chalupa law
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I think little counter packs would have been a much better way to reach down into that ~$5 price point they seem to be shooting for with these cards.
On second thought, maybe that's not the case, and here's why:

DMs buy counter packs. Fortune cards are targeted at players. We all know which group is larger. Whether players can be convinced to buy the cards is another matter entirely. So do you target a somewhat more practical product at a smaller group of consumers, or aim at igniting collectible fever in a larger audience with a product that's more splashy?
 

Andrew Tatro

Zod Almighty
Validated User
Correct me if I'm wrong, because I haven't played GW yet and only read the blurb about the Fortune cards in the link, but...

In GW, you don't know what cards you get, and you get a random card for each encounter right? It sounds like the player constructs a deck with the Fortune cards and plays them as they are triggered by events in the game.

So if I understand how these cards are used, the GW cards don't have a significant impact on play balance while the Fortune cards could give you major power boost with an optimized deck.
You can construct your own deck in GW, and the card you draw definitely does have a major impact on game balance. If it's a choice between having big giant clown feet or being able to shoot lasers out of your eyes, the lasers win every time.
 

Scholar and a Brutalman

Registered User
Validated User
Dear WotC,

Get Off My Lawn!

(I seem to be saying GOML a lot more lately.)

More seriously they have been trying to sell collectible cards in RPGs recently, first in GW and then here. Do they need a new revenue stream?
 

RadioKen

well versed in chalupa law
RPGnet Member
Validated User
More seriously they have been trying to sell collectible cards in RPGs recently, first in GW and then here. Do they need a new revenue stream?
I think they're looking for something with a more recession-friendly price point to sell alongside the bigger stuff.
 

CraftyShafty

+4 FieryWildebeest Slayer
Validated User
While I think the idea in general is a bit silly (always a bonus isn't 'random' to me), I guess it's a free country...

For some Wizards Play Network programs aimed at experienced players, Fortune Card purchase will be a requirement to participate
Oh wait, I guess it isn't.

I don't play in their 'network' or tournaments or whatever the kids are calling 'em these days, but the idea that I have to buy an "optional" accessory would make me think WotC is going to tack on more and more mandatory purchases just to play.

"Yup, it's an open event, come on in. You can pay your event registration fee to this gentleman. Now you need to purchase one of these Fortune decks from us. No, you can't use the one you brought. And a Class Powers deck. And Wonderous Event booster. And your character sheet must be validated by the DDI online character builder. Oh, and you need to purchase an official Wizards Play Network dice and token set."
 

Beri

Only One
On second thought, maybe that's not the case, and here's why:

DMs buy counter packs. Fortune cards are targeted at players. We all know which group is larger. Whether players can be convinced to buy the cards is another matter entirely. So do you target a somewhat more practical product at a smaller group of consumers, or aim at igniting collectible fever in a larger audience with a product that's more splashy?
This is a key point. These are microtransactions for players. WotC is trying to break out of the usual attachment to GMs - that is to say, for every 6 players, you only have one really buying books, minis, maps, and other accessories. These cards give players a way to spend money to enhance their game.

That being said, it doesn't really seem like something I'd use. I like the idea of getting occasional bonuses from the whims of chance, but this doesn't involve chance as much as it involves chasing down rare cards and building a good deck.

Hmm...the way I'd use these would be for the GM to have all the cards, and pass out cards like treasure. Over time, the players' decks get better, to represent paragon and epic heroes being more favored by destiny. However, that's the same darn thing again: the GM purchases and controls all the accessories.
 

CraftyShafty

+4 FieryWildebeest Slayer
Validated User
Hmm...the way I'd use these would be for the GM to have all the cards, and pass out cards like treasure. Over time, the players' decks get better, to represent paragon and epic heroes being more favored by destiny. However, that's the same darn thing again: the GM purchases and controls all the accessories.
That's a good idea, and maybe if the group is contributing to the purchase (here GM, happy birthday) it would work to break the GM free of being the sole/primary purchaser.

It's good to see WotC trying to find ways to expand the consumer pool beyond the GM, but it's a risky business. One of the things that makes RPGs successful (from the perspective of getting new players to the table, that is) is there is a very low barrier to entry. The GM buys and reads the rules, the other X number of people just have to show up. Any purchases (Players Handbooks, etc) are entirely optional.

Obviously, that's also why it's hard to make money in this niche: 1 paying customer and 5 freeloaders. ;)

The trick is to create something so useful/cool in which all players will gleefully invest that also doesn't break your game.

I'll market it when I figure that out, but I'm pretty sure these cards ain't it.
 

privateer

Initiate
Validated User
On second thought, maybe that's not the case, and here's why:

DMs buy counter packs. Fortune cards are targeted at players. We all know which group is larger. Whether players can be convinced to buy the cards is another matter entirely. So do you target a somewhat more practical product at a smaller group of consumers, or aim at igniting collectible fever in a larger audience with a product that's more splashy?
Or you could combine the ideas. Each pack has x number of cards. Some of those cards contain monster tokens (say, 5 skeletons or a otyugh) and its stats card and the remaining cards (likely should be majority of the pack) have class neutral bennies.

Now DMs and players all have a reason to buy your packs.

Edit: Heck. Make the cards double-sided. At certain junctures, the DM pulls a card from teh common deck (it's a wandering monster encounter or a trap). At other times, the players pull a card from the same common deck. It's a magic fairy attack on the baddies for disturbing their fairy mounds.
 
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