Your favorite task resolution system

Borbetomagnus

Head Redcap
RPGnet Member
Validated User
If I would have remembered Torg Eternity in my first post I probably would have listed this as my favorite single game engine. The unique application of the d20 and it's weird die chart and exploding die system, mixed with the Drama Deck (Which makes it so dynamic and gets rid of that pesky initiative roll) just makes it exciting.
I've not played Torg Eternity yet, but I did play Bloodshadows many years ago and it used the Masterbook System, which I think was derived from Torg (original), and also used a d20 along with a deck of cards. I really liked the use of cards as a form of resolution mechanic to add that extra something, something.
 

Narcisista

Social Justice NPC
Validated User
Its about how you spend your character build points during character creation.

Because it's a roll under system, and the base Target Number to get a Success is the rank in the Attribute you are using then having a higher rank will statistically give greater odds of getting a Success.

It's much easier to roll under a 5 than a 3.

However, the points you use on Attributes can't be used on Skills, so your skills won't be as high.

I do think I have to correct my previous message. You only roll a number of dice equal to your Skill rating.

So the points used for skills give you more dice to roll. The higher your Skill rating, more d6's.

But if you spend a lot of points on Skills your Attributes will be more on the lower side.

You can have a skill rating of 7 or 8, but if the Attribute is a 2 than you only get a Success on any nat 1's rolled.
Damn I was initially interested in TBZ when anounced, but had lost interest by the time it came out, and for the last few month was thinking this could be a nifty task resolution system that I had never used. Interest in TBZ re-ignited...
 

Stacie.Winters1

Active member
Banned
Validated User
Damn I was initially interested in TBZ when anounced, but had lost interest by the time it came out, and for the last few month was thinking this could be a nifty task resolution system that I had never used. Interest in TBZ re-ignited...
I did go back into my book. I totally got the system right, just incorrect about which dice you roll. You roll the Attribute dice and your roll under target number is your Skill rank.
 

Narcisista

Social Justice NPC
Validated User
I did go back into my book. I totally got the system right, just incorrect about which dice you roll. You roll the Attribute dice and your roll under target number is your Skill rank.
Which makes more sense and fits my musing even better. Maybe with some added explosive sucess mechanic if TBZ doesn't have that as well.
 

Two Hours to Doom

Strangelove'n
Validated User
I really like the mechanics of Lasers and Feelings (Trollbabe, Arkham Horror (skill sliders), Dead of Night, others like these) where you roll over or under.
 

MichaelSD

Silver Dragon
Validated User
Wasn't that the one where you also could have more than one die, depending on Aptitude? So, for some skills, where you were especially gifted, you'd roll 2d10 or 3d10, and you only needed 1 success, but 2 or three would make the result more awesome. I liked that.

Yup. Neat system, simple and functional.
Yes, but that is the part I did not really like. It really skewed the success percentages way too hard in my humble opinion. Although the concept is neat.
 

Theo Axner

Likes dressing up, yes
Validated User
I like D100 (or D20, as in Pendragon) roll-under with a blackjack mechanic. My favourite version is the BRP variant used in the Swedish game Hjältarnas tid:

  • D100 roll-equal-or-under.
  • Doubles are critical successes and critical failures, respectively.
  • Within your success level, you want to roll as high as possible. In an opposed roll if, say, both succeed but neither criticals, the higher roll wins.
  • Difficulty is adjusted by ”opening” or ”closing” the roll. ”Open by 2” means that ANY roll where the single digit is 1 or 2 is a success, while ”close by 4” means that any roll with a single digit of 1, 2, 3 or 4 is a failure, and so on. This scales very neatly, making bonuses making more of a difference at low skill levels than high, and vice versa. (Basically, while closing a roll traditionally reduces the percentage chance of success, opening it reduces the percentage chance of failure.)
 

ajevans

Registered User
Validated User
My favourites are:

  • Genesys / FFG Star Wars: It's annoying to have to buy funny dice, and there's a 1 session learning curve, but when you get it, it's a great task resolution system that leads to interesting results, rather than a binary pass/fail.
  • HeroQuest: As described above, a fairly simple roll under system, but with plenty of room for growth as you gain masteries.
  • Fate: Very quick and intuitive.
 

simonpaulburley

Registered User
Validated User
I'm not here to self promote,but.......

I'm really proud of the system that powers a number of my games.

Depending on the game, stats run from 2-30 or 1-36. (Basically two numbers in the 1-6 range multiplied.)

The resolution is roll 2d6, multiply the result and add the stat. So a range of results from 3-66 (or 2-72)just from 2d6. Compare the results to a succes table. (10- fail, 60+ achieve the impossible etc.) if unopposed or to an opposing score if in conflict.

If in a conflict damage done is the lower of the two numbers rolled. (Higher in one game.)

But the fun is if doubles are rolled:

Double 1 or double 6 critical fail/success.

Any other double and the player gets to choose from a range of options. These can be:

Combat oriented (swap opponents, additional non combat action, remove a mook etc.)
Tactical (reserve a reroll for later in the game for yourself or someone else)
Story based (introduce a new plot element, change the plot direction, change the emotional state of an NPC etc.)

So just 2 ordinary d6's gives a cinematic (or gonzo) range of success outcomes, handles damage, criticals and a range of special effects allowing players to drive the story.

I love it. As you can probably guess, I'm very proud of it.
 

Immunis

Warrior in Woolworths
Validated User
For published systems then ubiquity and Fate are my favoured solutions. Both described earlier in this thread.

For a home brew then I loved the system that I created and used a good decade ago and have failed to take advantage of properly since.
Each player has a card pool of 1 to 8.
On a test they use stat + skill + a card of their choosing (stats typically 2 to 6 and skills ranked as 0, 2, 4, 6, 8)
Cards were not replaced till the pool was used up. Advanced feats allowed 9 and 10 to be added to the pool

The GM gave a public target number and had a deck of Jacks, Queens and Kings - pulling a Jack was a -1, Queen no change and King +1 to the public target number
The player could use higher cards and be safe or play lower and hope that the GM didn't pull a King.

The GM could put a couple of tough skill tests in to see if the party was willing to burn good cards or find clever solutions to keep their best cards for a future situation.

Overall it worked really well.
 
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