Your favorite task resolution system

darnest

PureImaginationNoLimits..
Validated User
#71
I loved James Bond D100 QR system and MERP in the old days, the d100 action roll up or under is just fun.
I really enjoy savage worlds (d6 + skill/attribute die, looking for totals of 4 and the dice explode)
Dnd (d20 +skill/attribute) just fast if binary
Genesys/Starwars/Warhammer Fantasy (3rd)-- Blew my mind up when I started with WFRP, the dice, the many ways to interpret outcomes. Even the location cards such an elegant way to inject change into a game. And Star Wars versus Genesys settings are different enough to bring the specific setting alive (so far)
Momentum gets a honorable mention as the system I have read and been fascinated by but never played so I am not sure I would like it. Would love to try.

I did go back into my book. I totally got the system right, just incorrect about which dice you roll. You roll the Attribute dice and your roll under target number is your Skill rank.
A question: TBZ uses d6's or different dice based on the Attribute? Do they go down then as you get better (d4 being the best cause 4 is the high?) And other than the lack of a momentum/story point mechanic it seems very much like Genesys or Momentum. What am I missing?

Lastly I will self promote a bit, :D
My Conflict System uses d100 roll under an attribute, but not for success. The roll determines how many Main Skills, SubSkills, and Past Events of a character the player can use (after the roll) to set their Success value (called a SkillSet). You miss the roll you can use 1, you make it you can use up to 5 (set by a character attribute called Skill Depth). Players have a spendable resource called Influence to re roll, boost a skill depth, trigger effects with subskills and such.
So you roll, this sets your Skill Depth, then decide what you want to do to get the best SkillSet you can. Skillset has to tie or beat the TN set by the GM. So do you re roll, take a failure, spend influence to boost your Skill Depth. Players make choices and set a SkillSet.
After a success players narrate based on what they used in their SkillSet or may make a strength roll to determine extended effects for hacking, combat, spells, and Psi powers. You roll a dice pool (d4,d6,d8,d10,d12, sometimes d20) which determines how good the action was and can cause criticals or effects based on what the hack/spell/psi pattern was.
The cool thing is everything on the character sheet can be used in some way to boost your chance for success or narrate some effect or change in the situation. The roll drives player choices, not success or failure, that's all on the player.
 

loconius

Registered User
Validated User
#72
I am really digging the Year Zero System, at least how it reads. Same goes for 2d20, and with its similarity to genesys, which I have played I am excited for both!
 

beholdsa

Tab Creations
Validated User
#73
They did something similar with the TSR Dragonlance 5th Age system using cards etc. I really liked that system too but never got to play around with it that much. It's collecting dust somewhere in my den.
I loved this system. It wasn't my first RPG, but it was the first one I really got into.

Cards are still my task resolution mechanic of choice.
 

jamieth

Registered User
Validated User
#74
Sum of (1...3) dice vs. linear combination of (stat, skill, mods, TN). Either roll over or roll under; they're the same thing, after all.

Update: though now that I think of it, I like "character stuff" and "situation stuff" to be represened on a different axis. As an example, oWoD's shifting TNs - the execution was deeply flawed, but the idea that character bonuses and circumstances penalties don't simply cancel each other is golden.
 
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The Convenient Skill

Fudge & FU Fanatic
Validated User
#75
I'm a fan of multiple systems, mostly described above: Fudge, Ubiquity (favourite die pool), Pendragon (easier than d% in my opinion)

Not mentioned yet is Freeform Universal. Incredibly simple d6 die pool (I tend to max out at 4 dice) with narrative results, although there is a variant with more dice but I like the simplicity of the original.

Also Advanced Heroquest. An obscure GW dungeoneering boardgame, that is essentially WFRP with simplified d12-based mechanics.
 

loconius

Registered User
Validated User
#76
I'm a fan of multiple systems, mostly described above: Fudge, Ubiquity (favourite die pool), Pendragon (easier than d% in my opinion)

Not mentioned yet is Freeform Universal. Incredibly simple d6 die pool (I tend to max out at 4 dice) with narrative results, although there is a variant with more dice but I like the simplicity of the original.

Also Advanced Heroquest. An obscure GW dungeoneering boardgame, that is essentially WFRP with simplified d12-based mechanics.
Oh man I loved advanced hero quest, I recall a d12 but I don’t remember the mechanics
 

goblinchemist

Registered User
Validated User
#77
I used to like dice pools but nowadays I'm turned off by having to roll large amounts of dice. I find 1-3 dice plus attribute/skill versus Target Number the most pleasing and simple to play with. 2d6 or 3d6 preferably, but I won't say no to d20...
 

The Convenient Skill

Fudge & FU Fanatic
Validated User
#78
Oh man I loved advanced hero quest, I recall a d12 but I don’t remember the mechanics
Bascially you had the same attribute array as WFRP (apart from Fellowship, which I added in 'back in the day').
Combat rolls were made by comparing Weapon Skills and rolling a d12, equally skilled opponents are hit on a 7+.
Bow Skill (as it was called) had a target number based on distance. Critical Hits and Fumbles were possible with both.
Damage was a bit clunky, rolling a number of d12 per Strength/Weapon versus enemies Toughness stat, but it ran fine. You can Crit and Fumble those too.
All of other checks were roll under attribute.

I sometimes think about writing it up as a proper WFRP-light alternative, but I've enough ideas already before going down that rabbit hole.
 

Weisenheim

Baroque Space Orc Mage
Validated User
#79
I typically enjoy dice pool systems of different stripes, from the way Blades does it to the way Cortex does it to the way Burning Wheel does it. I do tend to prefer my dice pools have caps on size, though, since I'm not a fan of rolling a handful of dice just because.

What makes me enjoy dice pools is probably the fact that you get a more balanced distribution of results as the pool increases - unless they aren't designed well, you should always get better at doing stuff in an absolute sense by increasing your dice pool, whether due to higher skill, circumstances in your favor, or whatever, rather than increasing the chances to succeed while also increasing the chances to not succeed.

Take the highest, as in Blades, is great because it's easy to see what your result is and the interpretation is pretty simple too, though the consequence of the roll may not be. The way position and effect play into the results is also interesting, though as part of the resolution mechanic based on fiction as much as, if not more than, pure mechanical consideration, they can be confusing sometimes to establish or wrap your head around. They don't represent difficulty, but they do fill the space that difficulty would in a different system.

Cortex's approach appeals because it can represent some shades of difference while still following a bounded set of results. There's ways to tweak it to get what you want more often, and increasing the number of faces on a die means you get a better chance of the result you're seeking as well as a lower chance of the result you're not seeking, which feels very much like the experience you want to get when your character gets mechanically 'better' at things. Talents and other such that let you keep additional dice add to the feeling that your character is actually specialized in a particular type of activity, too, because you get to have a chance for much higher results. The Plot Point economy is fairly good too for messing with this and doing other things besides.

Something like Burning Wheel's take on dice pools is relatively simple too. You know what counts as a hit, though there's provisions to upscale/progress through the way shading works. It's another way that you can see your character mechanically reflect the sense of improving at the same time as they get 'better' at stuff in terms of skill or attribute ratings. The fact that you actually progress your character's abilities based on making those rolls is good too.
 
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